VOLLEYS: It's worth noting that the range of variation with volleys is bigger than any other shot in tennis. The contact point could be anywhere between ankle height to above head height, and then add to that the fact players are often moving up the court before playing volleys, which leads to a wide variety of hitting stances. The variation in spin and power when hitting the volley also varies massively, which in turn affects the preparation and forward swing. That said, there are still many fundamentals to look for, and these will be done from footage of mid-height, mid-court standard volleys. Other types of volleys can be analysed on request.


FOREHAND VOLLEY


Grip: In what position(s) the hand(s) hold the racket to play the shot

Left arm release (right-hander): The moment that the left arm releases the racket

Unit turn: Turning of the body, which initiates preparation to play the shot

Lack of significant backswing: How much of a backswing occurs before the racket moves forward to hit the ball

Arm/Racket at end of backswing: Shape and position of the hitting arm and racket at the end of the backswing

Rhythm: How efficiently the arm and racket moves from the end of the backswing into the forward swing

Left foot step (right-hander): Where the left foot steps and when, as the forward swing is taking place

Arm/Racket shape during forward swing: The shape of the hitting arm and racket as it moves through the forward swing and through contact

Left arm balance: How well the left arm is helping overall balance after releasing the racket

Racket on contact point: The position/shape of the racket exactly when it contacts the ball

Eyes on the ball: Are the eyes looking at the ball before and during contact

Head still: Is the head still during and just after contact

Short follow-through: How far and where the racket travels after hitting the ball

Racket finish: The position/shape of the racket at the end of the swing

Left arm finish (right-hander): Position of the left arm at the end of the swing

Weight on finish: Distribution of body weight at the end of the swing

Balance on finish: How well the body maintains balance at the end of the swing

BACKHAND SLICE


Grip: In what position(s) the hand(s) hold the racket to play the shot

Unit turn: Turning of the body, which initiates preparation to play the shot

Arms at end of backswing: Hitting arm positions at the end of the backswing

Racket at end of backswing: Racket position/shape at the end of the backswing

Rhythm: How efficiently the arm and racket moves from the end of the backswing into the forward swing

Feet position: Where the feet are positioned as the forward swing starts

Feet balance: How well are the feet and body balanced as the forward swing starts

Leg load: How well the legs are pushing into the ground, ready to push up as the forward swing starts

Left arm release (right-hander): The moment that the left arm releases the racket

Arm/Racket shape during forward swing: The shape of the hitting arm and racket as it moves through the forward swing and through contact

Leg drive: The legs pushing from the ground during the forward swing

Left arm balance: How well the left arm is helping overall balance after releasing the racket

Racket on contact point: The position/shape of the racket exactly when it contacts the ball

Eyes on the ball: Are the eyes looking at the ball before and during contact

Head still: Is the head still during and just after contact

Weight transfer: How well body weight is transferring energy into the shot, less relevant for slice but this still plays a small role

Racket finish: The position/shape of the racket at the end of the swing

Left arm finish (right-hander): Position of the left arm at the end of the swing

Weight on finish: Distribution of body weight at the end of the swing

Balance on finish: How well the body maintains balance at the end of the swing

BACKHAND


Grip: In what position(s) the hand(s) hold the racket to play the shot

Unit turn: Turning of the body, which initiates preparation to play the shot

Hands level: How well the hands maintain a steady height from the ground during the backswing 

Racket height during backswing: The height of the racket from the ground through the backswing

Arm at end of backswing: Hitting arm position at the end of the backswing

Racket at end of backswing: Racket position/shape at the end of the backswing

Rhythm: How efficiently the arm and racket moves from the end of the backswing into the forward swing

Feet position: Where the feet are positioned as the forward swing starts

Feet balance: How well are the feet and body balanced as the forward swing starts

Leg load: How well the legs are pushing into the ground, ready to push up as the forward swing starts

Racket Dip: How the racket points downwards at the start of the forward swing, this movement makes topspin possible

Lay back of racket: The racket bending back before striking the ball, in order to increase potential racket acceleration

Leg drive: The legs pushing from the ground during the forward swing

Racket on contact point: The position/shape of the racket exactly when it contacts the ball

Arms on contact point: The position/shape of the hitting arms exactly when the racket contacts the ball

Eyes on the ball: Are the eyes looking at the ball before and during contact

Head still: Is the head still during and just after contact

Weight transfer: How well body weight is transferring energy into the shot

Topspin: How well the racket and arm are able to produce topspin, from their position/movement before, during, and after contact

Body rotation: Timing and quantity of body rotation occuring during the forward swing, contact with the ball, and the follow through

Extension: Extension of the racket and arm after contact, measured by racket/arm position during the phase of the swing that comes after the ball has been hit

Racket finish: The position/shape of the racket at the end of the swing

Weight on finish: Distribution of body weight at the end of the swing

Balance on finish: How well the body maintains balance at the end of the swing

VIDEO ANALYSIS SERVICE - EXPLAINED


The big focus of this service is to compare your shots with the pro's, but to do it in a constructive way. By this, I mean focusing on the fundamentals, aspects of tennis strokes that are common across all professional level players. There are more of these than you might think, and some are easily overlooked because they happen too quickly for the naked eye to be able to pick them up. The video highlights these clearly, and allows you to see it for yourself! There are also many aspects of tennis strokes that vary amongst the pro's, and this is taken into account when evaluating your shots. I'm also keen to stress that this service isn't about encouraging a player to copy a professional exactly. Each tennis player has their own unique style, and it's important that this is allowed to develop, but equally important that it should be built around the core fundamentals. Your video analysis report will evaluate a large number of aspects for each tennis shot (these are listed below in the jargon buster), and will highlight the ones that are most important for you to focus your improvement on (these will be marked in orange), whilst adding helpful comments where appropriate so you can understand them better. There will also be a list of suggested things to work on at the end of the report. This will be in order of importance and also going into a bit more detail. Finally, you will also be able to see exactly what the report picks up for yourself on the video, along with side-by-side and super-imposed comparisons with current top tennis professionals.


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


Who is this for: Whilst this is definitely more suited to higher level players with aspirations in the game, it can be helpful to any level player of any age who is keen and determined to improve their tennis game, and to maximise their potential. The lay-out of the report is designed to allow us to get really specific and technical with each shot, but at the same time the summary allows the whole thing to become much more simplified and clear to understand.


How is it done: It's done using an application on the ipad, the quality of which is as good (if not better) as any video analysis software out there. The process needs 3 people (player, feeder, recorder) unless the only shot being filmed is the serve.


How much will it cost: Main shots package (Forehand Drive, Backhand Drive, 1st Serve, and 2nd Serve) £95 +++ Full package (All those in the main shots, plus backhand slice, and forehand and backhand volley) £160 +++ Create your own package (Any 1 shot £40, Any 2 shots £72, Any 3 shots £99, Any 4 or more shots £30 per shot) Other shots we can look at include drop shots, smashes, drop volleys, drive volleys, return of serve, anything you can think of really! We can also look at footwork at critical moments, such as returning serve, within rallies, when recovering from out wide, approaching the net ect. Revisited shots: One of the best things about video analysis is after a period of time, you can compare then and now, to see what improvements have been made. For each shot you want to film for at least a second time, there is a flat rate of £25 per shot.


Why is Nick the man for the job: I have the passion and commitment that all good coaches have, but I also have an obsession with understanding the game of tennis, and all the technical aspects that come with it. This has driven me to delve deep into the many technical aspects of the main shots, and I’ve studied all the less prominent shots too. Thanks to a number of fantastic online resources, I have access to video libraries of literally thousands of slow-mo clips of current pro’s hitting all the different shots in the game, and also to studies and articles done by some of the world’s top international coaches. I also conduct my own studies, and I’m able to keep up-to-date with the very latest technical evolutions in the modern game. It’s this aspect of my coach development that makes me excellently suited to conduct video analysis to the highest standards.


How do I book a video analysis session: Please email me, follow the 'Nick' link at the top of the page for my contact info.


What will happen once I have booked: A 15-20 minute session will be arranged to have a warm-up and then film the required shots. From there, Nick will analyse the footage and prepare your video analysis report, which will be sent to you by email attachment in excel spreadsheet format. Nick will advise you roughly how long this will take, but it should be no longer than 1 week. We will then arrange a further 20-30 minute session to go through the footage, explaining the key points, and making sure you understand them by showing you on the ipad. This is also your chance to go through anything else that cropped up on the report, and have it explained by showing you clearly on the ipad.


Can I have access to the video footage after the session: Yes, the videos can be easily transferred from the app, and sent to you in a variety of formats.


Is video analysis the answer to all my tennis problems: No, but it will help! Video analysis will make it crystal clear which aspects of your technique can be improved in order to get maximum potential out of that shot. You then need to put in the hard work and practice to make those improvements, so there's no point doing the video analysis without being prepared to then go and work on making the adjustments that will enhance your game. Better technique will lead to more accuracy, consistency, power, and spin on your shots. It will also help prevent future injuries. Superior technique also holds up better under pressure, so your serve will be more likely to produce that ace on match point when the nerves are jangling! However, video analysis will not teach you essential tactical and mental skills that are needed to win matches and ultimately be a successful player.

NickW Tennis

BACKHAND VOLLEY


Grip: In what position(s) the hand(s) hold the racket to play the shot

Unit turn: Turning of the body, which initiates preparation to play the shot

Arm/Racket during the backswing: Shape and position of the hitting arm and racket through the backswing  

Arm/Racket at end of backswing: Shape and position of the hitting arm and racket at the end of the backswing

Left arm release (right-hander): The moment that the left arm releases the racket

Rhythm: How efficiently the arm and racket moves from the end of the backswing into the forward swing

Right foot step (left-hander): Where the right foot steps and when, as the forward swing is taking place

Arm/Racket shape during forward swing: The shape of the hitting arm and racket as it moves through the forward swing and through contact

Left arm balance: How well the left arm is helping overall balance after releasing the racket

Racket on contact point: The position/shape of the racket exactly when it contacts the ball

Eyes on the ball: Are the eyes looking at the ball before and during contact

Head still: Is the head still during and just after contact

Short follow-through: How far and where the racket travels after hitting the ball

Racket finish: The position/shape of the racket at the end of the swing

Left arm finish (right-hander): Position of the left arm at the end of the swing

Weight on finish: Distribution of body weight at the end of the swing

Balance on finish: How well the body maintains balance at the end of the swing

VIDEO ANALYSIS - JARGON BUSTER!


***Please remember that although everything listed here is important, some aspects hold much more importance than others, and this will be made clear in your personal report***


FOREHAND


Grip: In what position(s) the hand(s) hold the racket to play the shot

Unit turn: Turning of the body, which initiates preparation to play the shot

Left arm release (right-hander): The moment that the left arm separates from the racket

Left arm stretch (right-hander): The way that, after separation, the left arm stretches across the body and points to the side fence

Racket height during backswing: The height of the racket from the ground through the backswing

Arm at end of backswing: Hitting arm position at the end of the backswing

Racket at end of backswing: Racket position/shape at the end of the backswing

Rhythm: How efficiently the arm and racket moves from the end of the backswing into the forward swing

Feet position: Where the feet are positioned as the forward swing starts

Feet balance: How well are the feet and body balanced as the forward swing starts

Leg load: How well the legs are pushing into the ground, ready to push up as the forward swing starts

Lay back of racket: The racket bending back before striking the ball, in order to increase potential racket acceleration

Leg drive: The legs pushing from the ground during the forward swing

Racket on contact point: The position/shape of the racket exactly when it contacts the ball

Arm on contact point: The position/shape of the entire hitting arm exactly when the racket contacts the ball

Eyes on the ball: Are the eyes looking at the ball before and during contact

Head still: Is the head still during and just after contact

Weight transfer: How well body weight is transferring energy into the shot

Left arm balance (right-hander): How well the left arm is helping overall balance after the left arm stretch is complete

Topspin: How well the racket and arm are able to produce topspin, from their position/movement before, during, and after contact

Body rotation: Timing and quantity of body rotation occuring during the forward swing, contact with the ball, and the follow through

Extension: Extension of the racket and arm after contact, measured by racket/arm position during the phase of the swing that comes after the ball has been hit

Racket finish: The position/shape of the racket at the end of the swing

Weight on finish: Distribution of body weight at the end of the swing

Balance on finish: How well the body maintains balance at the end of the swing

1st SERVE


Grip: In what position(s) the hand(s) hold the racket to play the shot

Foot stance: How the feet are positioned at the start of the service motion

Racket/Ball break: How the racket and ball move apart from each other to get the service motion underway

Ball release: How smoothly the ball releases from the throwing hand, and the timing of it

Racket position usain bolt: The 1st phase of the service motion ends in the 'power position' that looks very much like Usain Bolt's lightening bolt celebration! For this, I look at the racket position/shape at this moment.

Arm position usain bolt: The position/shape of the racket arm in the power position

Foot stance usain bolt: How the feet are positioned when the power position has been reached

Knee bend: The timing, and depth of the knee bend in preparation to push up to hit the ball

Body rotation: The timing, and amount of upper body rotation when preparing to hit the ball

Shoulder tilt: The timing, and amount of shoulder tilt in preparation for hitting the ball

Hip movement: The timing, and amount of hip movement forward in preparation for hitting the ball

Throwing arm extension: How well the throwing hand opens up and arm extends upwards after releasing the ball

Throwing arm hold: How well the throwing arm maintains its extended position after release of the ball 

Ball toss height: The height of the ball throw, and how it relates to the efficiency of the serve

Racket drop: How well and effectively the racket drops behind the body before driving up to hit the ball

Tricep extension: How well the tricep muscles extend upwards as the racket comes out of the racket drop

Arm rotation before contact: Rotation of the arm from the shoulder, as the racket moves up to the ball from the racket drop

Leg drive: How well the legs drive upwards from the knee bend

Body extension on contact: How well the body has extended upwards at the moment of contact

Head position on contact: How the head is positioned at the moment of contact

Ball position on contact: The position of the ball at moment of contact

Throwing arm on contact: How well the throwing arm has tucked into the body at this stage of the serve

Arm rotation after contact: How well the arm rotation continues after contact with the ball

Racket after contact: How efficiently the racket has angled downwards during the follow through

Racket finish: The position of the racket at the end of the service motion

Position on landing: The position of the feet and body on landing after the service motion is complete

Balance on landing: Balance of the whole body on landing, after the service motion is complete


**2ND SERVE: This is evaluated on the same aspects as the 1st serve. However, they relate to the effectiveness of the serve in different ways. If there are many differences between your 1st and 2nd serve, then the whole list will be evaluated. If not, then you will simply get a short summary of the key points related to your 2nd serve**